History Podcasts

A.E.G. Dr.I

A.E.G. Dr.I

A.E.G. Dr.I

The A.E.G. Dr.I was an unsuccessful design for a triplane, based on the equally unsuccessful A.E.G. D.I.

In the summer of 1917 the Germans captured an intact Sopwith Triplane, and on 27 July issued a circular inviting aircraft designers to examine the aircraft. One result of this was a rash of German triplanes, most of which were unsuccessful. A.E.G. was better known for its single engined two-man reconnaissance aircraft and twin engined bombers, but during 1917 the company had also produced the A.E.G. D.I, a single bay fighter that was ordered in small numbers before being cancelled after two out of three prototypes crashed.

The company decided to use the D.I as the basis for its own triplane fighter. The Dr.I thus had the same welded steel tube fuselage and fabric covering as the D.I, and used the same Daimler D.IIIa engine in an ungainly mounting, with part of the engine exposed above the fuselage. It was given a new set of triplane wings, with the lower wing level with the base of the fuselage, the middle wing just below the top of the fuselage and the upper wing above the fuselage. The upper wing was notably larger than the lower two wings. The wingspan was three feet wider than on the D.I, but loaded weight only increased by around 70lbs.

The Dr.I was completed by October 1917. Tests revealed that it had poor handling characteristics and poor performance, with a much lower speed than the D.I, and development of the type was abandoned.

Engine: Daimler D IIIa six cylinder water cooled engine
Power: 160hp
Crew: 1
Span: 30ft 10in
Length: 20ft 0 1/8in
Empty weight: 1,565lb
Loaded weight: 2,138lb
Max speed: 106mph

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


AEG N.I

The AEG N.I was a German biplane night-bomber which saw limited action during World War I. A total of 37 were built. Several were used postwar as airliners.

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central and Western Europe, lying between the Baltic and North Seas to the north, and the Alps to the south. It borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, France to the southwest, and Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands to the west.

A biplane is a fixed-wing aircraft with two main wings stacked one above the other. The first powered, controlled aeroplane to fly, the Wright Flyer, used a biplane wing arrangement, as did many aircraft in the early years of aviation. While a biplane wing structure has a structural advantage over a monoplane, it produces more drag than a similar unbraced or cantilever monoplane wing. Improved structural techniques, better materials and the quest for greater speed made the biplane configuration obsolete for most purposes by the late 1930s.

World War I, also known as the First World War or the Great War, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from 28 July 1914 to 11 November 1918. Contemporaneously described as "the war to end all wars", it led to the mobilisation of more than 70 million military personnel, including 60 million Europeans, making it one of the largest wars in history. It is also one of the deadliest conflicts in history, with an estimated nine million combatants and seven million civilian deaths as a direct result of the war, while resulting genocides and the 1918 influenza pandemic caused another 50 to 100 million deaths worldwide.


Data from German Aircraft of the First World War and Wagner/Nowarra, German Combat Planes pg.73.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 6.1 m (20 ft 0 in)
  • Wingspan: 8.5 m (27 ft 11 in)
  • Height: 2.65 m (8 ft 8 in)
  • Wing area: 16.14 m 2 (173.7 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 685 kg (1,510 lb)
  • Gross weight: 940 kg (2,072 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Daimler D.IIIa 6-cylinder, liquid-cooled, inline piston engine, 120 kW (160 hp)
  • Maximum speed: 205 km/h (127 mph 111 kn)
  • Range: 465 km (289 mi 251 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 5,000 m (16,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 6.67 m/s (1,313 ft/min)
  • Time to altitude: 1,000 m (3,300 ft) in 2.2 minutes
    5,000 m (16,000 ft) in 25 minutes
  • Wing loading: 58 kg/m 2 (12 lb/sq ft)
  • Power/mass: 0.13 kW/kg (0.08 hp/lb)

Disability History: The Disability Rights Movement

President George H.W. Bush signing the Americans with Disabilities Act. Photo inscribed to Justin Dart, Jr., 1990.

Image from the National Museum of American History (CC BY-SA 2.0 https://www.flickr.com/photos/nationalmuseumofamericanhistory/20825041956/)

Treatment and perceptions of disability have undergone transformation since the 1900s. This has happened largely because people with disabilities have demanded and created those changes. Like other civil rights movements, the disability rights movement has a long history. Examples of activism can be found among various disability groups dating back to the 1800s. Many events, laws, and people have shaped this development. To date, the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the subsequent ADA Amendments Act (2008) are the movement’s greatest legal achievements. The ADA is a major civil rights law that prohibits discrimination of people with disabilities in many aspects of public life. The disability rights movement continues to work hard for equal rights.

Organizations by and for people with disabilities have existed since the 1800s. However, they exploded in popularity in the 1900s. The League of the Physically Handicapped organized in the 1930s, fighting for employment during the Great Depression. In the 1940s a group of psychiatric patients came together to form We Are Not Alone. [2] They supported patients in the transition from hospital to community. In 1950, several local groups came together and formed the National Association for Retarded Children (NARC). By 1960, NARC had tens of thousands of members, most of whom were parents. They were dedicated to finding alternative forms of care and education for their children. [3] Meanwhile, people with disabilities received assistance through the leadership of various presidents in the 1900s. President Truman formed the National Institute of Mental Health in 1948. Between the years 1960 and 1963, President Kennedy organized several planning committees to treat and research disability. [3]

The US Congress has passed many laws that support disability rights either directly or by recognizing and enforcing civil rights. Civil rights laws such as Brown v. Board of Education and its decision that school segregation is unconstitutional laid the groundwork for recognizing the rights of people with disabilities. Several sections of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, which specifically address disability discrimination, are especially important to the disability rights movement. Section 501 supports people with disabilities in the federal workplace and in any organization receiving federal tax dollars. Section 503 requires affirmative action, which supports employment and education for members of traditionally disadvantaged minority groups. Section 504 prohibits discrimination against individuals with disabilities in the workplace and in their programs and activities. Section 508 guarantees equal or comparable access to technological information and data for people with disabilities. The regulations for Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 were written but not implemented. In 1977, the disability rights community was tired of waiting, and demanded that President Carter sign the regulations. Instead, a task force was appointed to review them. Afraid that the review would weaken the protections of the Act, the American Coalition of Citizens with Disabilities (ACCD) insisted they be enacted as written by 5 April 1977, or the coalition would take action. When the date arrived and the regulations remained unsigned, people across the country protested by sitting-in at federal offices of Health, Education, and Welfare (the agency responsible for the review). In San Francisco, the sit-in at the Federal Building lasted until April 28, when the regulations were finally signed, unchanged. This was, according to organizer Kitty Cone, the first time that “disability really was looked at as an issue of civil rights rather than an issue of charity and rehabilitation at best, pity at worst.” [4]

The 1975 Education of All Handicapped Children Act guaranteed children with disabilities the right to public school education. These laws have occurred largely due to the concerted efforts of disability activists protesting for their rights and working with federal government. In all, the United States Congress passed more than 50 pieces of legislation between the 1960s and the passage of the ADA in 1990.

Self-advocacy groups have also shaped the national conversation around disability. Self-advocacy means representing one's own interests. Such groups include DREDF (Disability Rights Education and Defense Fund), ADAPT (Americans Disabled for Accessible Public Transportation, later changed to Americans Disabled Attendant Programs Today), and the CIL (Center for Independent Living). The CIL provides services for people with disabilities in the community. The CIL began in the early 1960s at Cowell Memorial Hospital . Located in California, Cowell Memorial Hospital was once listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The building is now demolished, but its legacy remains. The hospital supported the "Rolling Quads" and the "Disabled Students Program” at University of California Berkeley. Students Ed Roberts and John Hessler founded both organizations. Both men lived with physical disabilities and needed to find housing options after their acceptance to the university. University dormitories could not manage Roberts' iron lung, an assistive breathing device for people with polio, or Hessler's physical needs. Hessler and Roberts instead lived at Cowell Memorial Hospital when they arrived at college in the early 1960s. With the assistance of College of San Mateo counselor Jean Wirth, they demanded access to the school and encouraged other students with physical disabilities to attend UC Berkeley. They also influenced school architecture and planning. UC Berkeley eventually created housing accommodations for these students. It was there that the students planted the seed of the independent living movement. The independent living movement supports the idea that people with disabilities can make their own decisions about living, working, and interacting with the surrounding community. This movement is a reaction to centuries of assisted living, psychiatric hospitals, and doctors and parents who had made decisions for individuals with disabilities.

Roberts, Hessler, Wirth and others established the Disabled Students Program at UC Berkeley. Although this was not the first program of its kind-- Illinois offered similar services beginning in the 1940s-- the UC Berkeley Program was groundbreaking. They promoted inclusion for all kinds of students on campus. The program inspired universities across the country to create similar organizations. Many of these organizations are still active today.

Dr. Frank Kameny at Pride, 2010.

Photo by David (CC BY-2.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Kameny_June_2010_Pride_1.jpg)

The Rolling Quads and CIL are among two groups from the disability rights movement. Disability activists also work with other communities to attain their goals. People form communities based on shared values, ideas, and identity. The strength and activism of a community can help change attitudes across society at large. Perceptions of disability and resulting treatment often intersect with other groups advocating for their civil and human rights. One example of this change is the treatment of the the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer (LGBTQ) community. Doctors regarded homosexuality as a disease well into the 20th century. They could send men and women to psychiatric hospitals for their sexual preference. It was not until the 1970s that this "diagnosis" changed.

The Dr. Franklin Kameny Residence is part of this important history. Kameny had served as an astronomer and worked with the U.S. Army Map Service. In the 1950s, he refused to reveal his sexual orientation to the government. In response, the US government fired Kameny from his job. Kameny spent the rest of his life working as an activist and advocate for LGBTQ rights. His home provided the space for people to safely express and identify themselves. In 1973, Kameny successfully led the fight to abolish homosexuality from the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The DSM is the official handbook used by healthcare professionals to diagnose psychiatric issues and disabilities. This decision legally removed the status of homosexuality as a disorder. It also helped shift perceptions of homosexuality. More and more people began to understand it was not wrong or defective. The Kameny Residence continues to help us recognize and embrace the work of the gay civil rights community.

Other activists also took to the streets and demonstrated for disability rights. Some of these protests occurred at locations that are today listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1988, students at Gallaudet University, the only American university specifically for deaf students, led the "Deaf President Now" protest. Students made several demands, calling for a Deaf president and majority Deaf population on the Board of Trustees. This week-long protest resulted successfully in the appointment of deaf president, Dr. I. King Jordan. Their protest inspired inclusion and integration across communities. [5]

Two years later in 1990, protesters gathered on the steps of the United States Capitol building. They were anxiously awaiting the passage of the ADA, which had stalled due to issues around transportation. Public transit companies fought against the strict regulations for accessibility, and their lobbying efforts slowed the entire process. In response, a group of individuals with disabilities headed for the Capitol. They tossed aside their wheelchairs, walkers, and crutches and ascended the steps. This event has since become known as the "Capitol Crawl." By dragging themselves up the stairs, these protesters expressed their daily struggles due to physical barriers. In so doing, they highlighted the need for accessibility. Iconic images of this event spread across the country. The Americans with Disabilities Act ultimately passed in July of 1990 and was signed by President George H.W. Bush. The ADA and other civil rights legislation have transformed opportunities for people with disabilities. However, over 25 years later, there is still much work to be done.

This article is part of the Telling All Americans’ Stories Disability History Series. The series focuses on telling selected stories through historic places. It offers a glimpse into the rich and varied history of Americans with disabilities.


References:
[1] Disability Minnesota. The ADA Legacy Project: A Magna Carta and the Ides of March to the ADA, 2015
[2] Disability History. Disability Militancy - the 1930s Fountain House. The Origin of Fountain House.
[3] Michael Rembis, “Introduction,” in Michael Rembis, ed. Disabling Domesticity (Palgrave Macmillen).
[4] Grim, Andrew. “Sitting-in for disability rights: The Section 504 protests of the 1970s.” O Say Can You See? Stories from the National Museum of American History, July 8, 2015.
[5] Disability History. Disability Militancy - the 1930s Fountain House. The Origin of Fountain House.


AEG C.I

The AEG C.I was the first armed aircraft model of the Allgemeine Elektricitäts-Gesellschaft in 1915, and with the advent of the first fighter aircraft, it was intended to enable the Enlightenment forces to defend themselves against attacks.

Development and construction:

The Type B Series reconnaissance aircraft were unarmed and lightly armored aircraft with a focus on speed and range rather than defense. With the appearance of the first fighters, both the pilots and the military leadership realized that the used reconnaissance aircraft were too vulnerable to attacks.

For this reason, work began on the development of armed reconnaissance aircraft as early as the end of 1914. The company AEG made use of the experience and construction of B.II aircraft. In these only a stronger engine was installed and mounted for the observer on a wreath a machine gun. This should make it possible to fight enemy fighters themselves. In addition, the observer was now transferred to the rear seat and the pilot was placed on the front seat.

Use in the First World War:

From 1915, the first type C aircraft were used on the western front. By arming the aircraft, the reconnaissance aircraft should be allowed to perform their duties while still defending themselves against enemy hunters.

Since almost all aircraft of the first C series were based on constructions of the B series and these corresponded to the requirements of the military only to a small extent, were planned already at delivery of the aircraft to successor models.

With the introduction of more armored aircraft, which also had a higher maneuver incapacitated, the first aircraft of the C series were gradually withdrawn from the front.

Technical specifications:

Designation: AEG C.I
Country: German Empire
Typ: Armed reconnaissance aircraft
Length: 7,8 meters
Span: 13,07 meters
Height: 3,1 meters
Mass: 710kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: Benz Bz III or Mercedes D III, 150PS
Maximum speed: 130 km/h
Reach: unknown
Armament: 1 x 7,92 mm Parabellum machine gun or Bergmann machine gun 15nA

You can find the right literature here:

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces) Paperback – Bargain Price, August 25, 2001

Undoubtedly the most famous fighter type to see service on either side during World War 1, the Fokker Dr I was a revelation when it entered service on the western front in 1917. Manfred von Richthofen’s JG 1 ‘circus’ was the first Jasta to completely re-equip with the new fighter, and in the skilled hands of its numerous aces the Dr I proved a formidable opponent. The Dr I remained in service on the Western Front until replaced by the superior Fokker D VII in May 1918. Just weeks prior to that, however, Germany’s leading ace, the great ‘Red Baron’, had been killed at the controls of a Dr I.

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21)

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21) Paperback – February 16, 2016

This book describes and illustrates the development of Friedrichshafen aircraft of WWI with text, 540 photos, 18 in color, 37 color profiles, production quantities and serial numbers of aircraft, and aircraft dimensions and performance specifications. In addition, there are 26 official SVK drawings and 11 aircraft are illustrated in scale drawings to 1/48 (4) or 1/72 (7) scales. The book has 312 pages and is of interest to aviation historians, enthusiasts, and modelers alike.

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918 Paperback – December 15, 2010

Much has been written about the British aircraft of the First World War, but little has surfaced about the aircraft of the Axis powers, Germany and Austria. Here, Terry C. Treadwell tells the story of the aircraft from companies such as Fokker, builder of the famous triplane, as fl own by Baron von Richthofen's Flying Circus, AEG, Albatros, Junkers and Hansa. From reconnaissance aircraft to state-of-the-art bombers that could reach London, this is the definitive guide to aircraft of the Axis powers during the First World War. The aircraft are explained in detail and a history of each company is provided, making this an excellent source book for aircraft enthusiasts, model makers and those interested in the air war over the trenches of France and Belgium, as well as further afield in the Italian campaign.

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division Hardcover – January 9, 1997

The standard reference now revised and expanded. Dr. Robinson has opened up his vast photo archives to enhance this new edition of his classic work. Much of the new photographic material is published here for the first time.


AEG G.I and successor aircraft

The AEG G.I was the first bomber of the company AEG, which should replace the outdated Zeppelins and should take over the task of tactical bombardments. But only the AEG G.IV bomber could fulfill the expectations.

Development and construction:

Shortly after the beginning of World War I, it became apparent that the Zeppelins used by the Germans could no longer take on the task of tactical bombardment. These were simply too slow, cumbersome and easy targets for the enemy air defense and aircraft. Even frequent accidents led to a high loss of Zeppelin, which led to the end of 1914, the German army command to the aircraft manufacturers, the order to develop a moderately heavy bomber, which could carry a bomb load of 250 to 300 kg and faster than Zeppelins was.

At the beginning of 1915, the company AEG was able to present the prototype of the fighter I (K.I), which was a two-piece, taut biplane in wood construction. Only later was this aircraft designated as G.I. The crew consisted of a pilot and an observer who sat in a pulpit in front of the pilot and also operated the machine gun. The aircraft was equipped with two water-cooled inline engines Mercedes D I each with 105 hp. However, these engines were completely inadequate for this bomber, so that only a few aircraft were built by the AEG G.I and these were used almost exclusively for testing.

In the AEG G.II, the span was first increased and at the rear of the fuselage another pulpit installed, where a third crew member took place and also used a machine gun to protect the aircraft against attacks from behind. Equipped was the G.II with the slightly stronger Benz Bz III engines with 150 hp each. Even with this prototype, the performance of the engines was too low to commission a series production.

The G.III developed and presented only a few later had two Mercedes
D IV engines with 220 hp each. Although these engines were not yet sufficient for such a bomber, but were of this type around 120 aircraft built and used at the front.

End of 1916, the AEG G.IV was presented, which differed externally only by a modified aileron of the G.III, technically, however, was much more mature and its equipment significantly contributed to improving the operational capability. Thus, two Mercedes D IVa engines with 260 hp were installed, which provided a significant increase in performance. Furthermore, the crew was able to change places when needed because of the passageways in the fuselage, had heatable aviator clothing and had the newly developed Zeiss bomb targeting device on board, which was much more accurate and could also be used at night. Thus the G.III counted among the first, full-fledged bombers of the German air force and was with 217 built airplanes one of the most produced German bombers of the war.

Use in the First World War:

When the first G.I bombers were introduced, they were designed to fight ground targets as well as enemy aircraft. After a test flight of the well-known Manfred von Richthofen, however, said this, that such aircraft against enemy aircraft would be completely useless. So the order was spent only for tactical bombardments.

Neither the AEG G.I nor the G.II had deployments at the front because these aircraft were totally inappropriate. From the G.III were only up to 20 aircraft at the front, as these were also not yet mature enough.

Although the AEG G.IV could not keep up with the bombers of the Gotha or Friedrichshafen types also used, for individual tactical bombardments and in support of the infantry they proved to be very well suited. Among other things, Saloniki, Bucharest, Verona, Venice, Padua and Paris were bombarded by these aircraft.

At the end of the war, around 50 aircraft of the AEG G.III and G.IV were still in use on all fronts. The only surviving copy of an AEG G.IV is now exhibited at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum in Ottawa.

Technical specifications:

Designation: AEG G.I
Country: German Empire
Typ: Bomber
Length: 8,65 meters
Span: 16 meters
Height: 3,46 meters
Mass: 1160kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: two water-cooled inline engines Mercedes D I each with 105 hp
Maximum speed: 125 km/h
Reach: 450 kilometers
Armament: 1 x 7,9 mm machine gun (500 cartridges each) and up to 200 kg bombs

Designation: AEG G.II
Country: German Empire
Typ: Bomber
Length: 11 meters
Span: 20 meters
Height: 3,46 meters
Mass: 1160kg empty
Crew: Max. 3
Engine: two water-cooled in-line engines Benz Bz III with 150 hp each
Maximum speed: 125 km/h
Reach: 700 kilometers
Armament: 2 x 7,9 mm Parabellum machine guns 14 (500 cartridges each) and up to 200 kg bombs

Designation: AEG G.III
Country: German Empire
Typ: Bomber
Length: 9,2 meters
Span: 18,44 meters
Height: 3,46 meters
Mass: 2000kg empty
Crew: Max. 3
Engine: two water-cooled inline engines Mercedes D IV with each 220 hp
Maximum speed: 150 km/h
Reach: 700 kilometers
Armament: 2 x 7,9 mm Parabellum machine guns 14 (500 cartridges each) and up to 300 kg bombs

Designation: AEG G.IV
Country: German Empire
Typ: Bomber
Length: 9,85 meters
Span: 18,44 meters
Height: 3,89 meters
Mass: 2400kg empty
Crew: Max. 3
Engine: two water-cooled inline engines Mercedes D IVa with each 260 hp
Maximum speed: 165 km/h
Reach: 700 kilometers
Armament: 2 x 7,9 mm Parabellum machine guns 14 (500 cartridges each) and up to 400 kg bombs

You can find the right literature here:

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces) Paperback – Bargain Price, August 25, 2001

Undoubtedly the most famous fighter type to see service on either side during World War 1, the Fokker Dr I was a revelation when it entered service on the western front in 1917. Manfred von Richthofen’s JG 1 ‘circus’ was the first Jasta to completely re-equip with the new fighter, and in the skilled hands of its numerous aces the Dr I proved a formidable opponent. The Dr I remained in service on the Western Front until replaced by the superior Fokker D VII in May 1918. Just weeks prior to that, however, Germany’s leading ace, the great ‘Red Baron’, had been killed at the controls of a Dr I.

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21)

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21) Paperback – February 16, 2016

This book describes and illustrates the development of Friedrichshafen aircraft of WWI with text, 540 photos, 18 in color, 37 color profiles, production quantities and serial numbers of aircraft, and aircraft dimensions and performance specifications. In addition, there are 26 official SVK drawings and 11 aircraft are illustrated in scale drawings to 1/48 (4) or 1/72 (7) scales. The book has 312 pages and is of interest to aviation historians, enthusiasts, and modelers alike.

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918 Paperback – December 15, 2010

Much has been written about the British aircraft of the First World War, but little has surfaced about the aircraft of the Axis powers, Germany and Austria. Here, Terry C. Treadwell tells the story of the aircraft from companies such as Fokker, builder of the famous triplane, as fl own by Baron von Richthofen's Flying Circus, AEG, Albatros, Junkers and Hansa. From reconnaissance aircraft to state-of-the-art bombers that could reach London, this is the definitive guide to aircraft of the Axis powers during the First World War. The aircraft are explained in detail and a history of each company is provided, making this an excellent source book for aircraft enthusiasts, model makers and those interested in the air war over the trenches of France and Belgium, as well as further afield in the Italian campaign.

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division Hardcover – January 9, 1997

The standard reference now revised and expanded. Dr. Robinson has opened up his vast photo archives to enhance this new edition of his classic work. Much of the new photographic material is published here for the first time.


How to Recover iPhone Data?

Deleted data isn't erased completely at first. They still exist in your phone storage. With a professional iPhone data recovery software like Dr.Fone, you still have a large chance to bring them back. Sooner you act, better are the recovery results.

Recovery Mode

As the personal data recovery industry leader, Dr.Fone provides 3 iPhone data recovery modes to ensure the highest iPhone data recovery rate. It not only recovers data from iPhone/iPad directly but is also able to extract data from iCloud and iTunes backup files selectively.

Recover from iOS Device

Connect your iPhone or iPad to the computer and recover the deleted/lost data from the device without backup.

Recover from iTunes Backup File

Scan and extract the content of the iTunes backup. Export or restore them selectively.

Recover from iCloud Backup File

Download and extract data from iCloud backup. Restore selected iCloud content to the device.

3 Steps to Get Back Everything

iPhone data recovery sounds like a high-skilled task for most common iOS users. Now, Dr.Fone has made the task manageable for everyone. Bringing back your precious data has never been so easy.

Step 1: Launch Dr.Fone and connect your iPhone.

Step 2: Select file types and start to scan the iPhone.

Step 3: Preview the data and recover them successfully.


AEG B.I

The AEG B.I was a military version of the civil aircraft AEG Z6 and the first aircraft of the company, which was produced for the new flying force of the German Empire.

Development and construction:

As the continuous development of an air force continued in the German Empire, military aircraft were presented by various companies.

The civil aircraft AEG Z6 was one of the first biplane aircraft, but was initially used only for civilian operation. The company AEG, however, modified the model something with which it could be used as a reconnaissance and training aircraft by the military.

Striking was the construction of welded steel pipe, which was carried out not only in the fuselage but also in the wings of the aircraft. Was also installed a 100hp strong inline engine, which, however, limited by its high seat aerodynamics.

Under the engine was an additional wheel, which should prevent a landslide.

Rimo Dohrn in front of his AEG B.I in 1914

Use in the First World War:

With the outbreak of the First World War, the unarmed aircraft were used exclusively for reconnaissance flights and as a training aircraft. After a short time the types B.I were replaced by the B.II and B.III types.

Technical specifications:

Designation: AEG B.I
Country: German Empire
Typ: Reconnaissance aircraft, trainer aircraft
Length: 10,5 Meter
Span: 14,5 Meter
Height: unknown
Mass: 744 kg empty
Crew: Max. 2
Engine: Water-cooled inline 6-cylinder engine Benz FX (Bz II) or Mercedes D I 100PS
Maximum speed: 110 km/h
Reach: unknown
Armament: none

You can find the right literature here:

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces)

Fokker Dr I Aces of World War 1 (Aircraft of the Aces) Paperback – Bargain Price, August 25, 2001

Undoubtedly the most famous fighter type to see service on either side during World War 1, the Fokker Dr I was a revelation when it entered service on the western front in 1917. Manfred von Richthofen’s JG 1 ‘circus’ was the first Jasta to completely re-equip with the new fighter, and in the skilled hands of its numerous aces the Dr I proved a formidable opponent. The Dr I remained in service on the Western Front until replaced by the superior Fokker D VII in May 1918. Just weeks prior to that, however, Germany’s leading ace, the great ‘Red Baron’, had been killed at the controls of a Dr I.

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21)

Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI: A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes (Great War Aviation) (Volume 21) Paperback – February 16, 2016

This book describes and illustrates the development of Friedrichshafen aircraft of WWI with text, 540 photos, 18 in color, 37 color profiles, production quantities and serial numbers of aircraft, and aircraft dimensions and performance specifications. In addition, there are 26 official SVK drawings and 11 aircraft are illustrated in scale drawings to 1/48 (4) or 1/72 (7) scales. The book has 312 pages and is of interest to aviation historians, enthusiasts, and modelers alike.

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918

German and Austro-Hungarian Aircraft Manufacturers 1908-1918 Paperback – December 15, 2010

Much has been written about the British aircraft of the First World War, but little has surfaced about the aircraft of the Axis powers, Germany and Austria. Here, Terry C. Treadwell tells the story of the aircraft from companies such as Fokker, builder of the famous triplane, as fl own by Baron von Richthofen's Flying Circus, AEG, Albatros, Junkers and Hansa. From reconnaissance aircraft to state-of-the-art bombers that could reach London, this is the definitive guide to aircraft of the Axis powers during the First World War. The aircraft are explained in detail and a history of each company is provided, making this an excellent source book for aircraft enthusiasts, model makers and those interested in the air war over the trenches of France and Belgium, as well as further afield in the Italian campaign.

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division

The Zeppelin in Combat: A History of the German Naval Airship Division Hardcover – January 9, 1997

The standard reference now revised and expanded. Dr. Robinson has opened up his vast photo archives to enhance this new edition of his classic work. Much of the new photographic material is published here for the first time.


Indice

Durante le prime fasi della prima guerra mondiale, nell'ambito della ricerca al fine migliorare prestazioni e capacità operative dei mezzi aerei, la AEG decise di avviare uno sviluppo del bombardiere AEG G.III. Il nuovo modello, al quale l'Idflieg assegnò la designazione G.IV in quanto quarto progetto relativo alla classe di velivoli G-Typ sviluppati dall'AEG, era finalizzato ad operazioni di bombardamento tattico e riproponeva l'impostazione del suo predecessore, bimotore biplano con fusoliera metallica ad abitacoli aperti e carrello fisso, introducendo alcune variazioni strutturali, come l'innalzamento della postazione difensiva posteriore, ed incorporando alcune nuove tecnologie, un'apparecchiatura radio ricetrasmittente e, per agevolare l'equipaggio costretto ad affrontare le rigide temperature in quota, giubbotti riscaldati da resistenze elettriche.

Il prototipo, portato in volo per la prima volta nei tardi anni 1916, venne proposto alla commissione esaminatrice dell'Idflieg che esprimendosi favorevolmente chiese di avviare il modello alla produzione in serie.


Watch the video: TSO50 L-Quarters AG. Darn Ike VS. AEG. Dr. Bellpepper Sheik (December 2021).